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Chinese acupressure for the eyes

In Health and Healing, Health and Nutrition by leo.angartLeave a Comment

These exercises are especially useful when you feel that your head is getting a bit woolly because they get the energy moving around your eyes and head. Useful for almost any vision problem.

There are ten steps to this exercise. Its purpose is to get the energy flowing through your eyes and head. You may notice that some of the pressure points feel slightly tender. This indicates that energy is not flowing very freely at that particular energy point. The massage movement will start things moving again and you will feel a wonderful freshness and openness after this exercise.

  1. Acupressure 1The first point –bladder meridian B2, which improves eye problems –is located at the root of the nose and up under the eyebrow. Place the tip of your thumb as close as possible to the inner corner of the eye and press upwards. You will sense a tender spot right where the point is located. Rotate gently three times either right or left. Alternatively, just press and release several times.
  2. Acupressure 2The second point –bladder meridian B1, which also improves eye problems –is located on each side of the root of the nose, right where the petals of your glasses normally rest. Use your thumb and index finger and grip the root of your nose. Make gentle circular movements. Alternatively, you can just press and release.
  3. Acupressure 3The third point –stomach meridian ST3, which improves cataracts and swelling under the eyes –is located on the cheekbone at the same level as your nostrils, about one-and-one-half fingers outwards. Use three fingers and you are sure to touch this point. Do gentle circular movements. Alternatively, you can also just press and release.
  4. Acupressure 4The fourth step involves several acupuncture points along the bone over your eyes (gallbladder GB2 and triple warmer). Begin where you found the first point, then move outwards in small steps across the bone to the outer corner of the eye.
  5. Acupressure 5Next comes the bone under the eye. At the inner corner of the eye we have the first point of what is known as the bladder meridian. Directly underneath the centre of the eyeball we have the first point of the stomach meridian, ST1, which relieves red eye, night-blindness, over-active tear ducts and also near-sight. The easiest way to do this is to use four fingers and press down and release on the edge of the bone. Sometimes you will feel a wonderful coolness flowing down over your eyes indicating the flow of energy.
  6. Acupressure 6The next step is the gallbladder GL1point located at the outer corners of the eye. Massage with gentle circular movements.
  7. Acupressure 7Next, move to the hairline and the TW22point on the triple warmer. Massage with gentle circular movements.
  8. Acupressure 6Move a bit further back, placing your fingertips on an imaginary vertical line moving up from the ears. Massage the four points beneath your fingertips. This is the gallbladder meridian. Massage with three circular movements right to left (counterclockwise). Then energise with left-to-right clockwise movements.
  9. Acupressure 9This movement is often referred to as the ‘tiger climbing the mountain’. Open and close your fingers as if they were claws –the movement you use when you are washing your hair. Start from the hairline and move up and back towards the centre of the head, using one long, smooth movement. You can use the soft part of your fingers (if you have long finger nails) or you can use your nails. Put some pressure on to get the energy flowing. With this one movement you stimulate more than 15 acupuncture points on each side of your head.
  10. Acupressure 10The final point is located at the back of the head, just where your neck muscles are attached to the skull. You will find some indentations on each side of your head –this is where the 20 gallbladder points are located. Massage with gentle circular movements.

These energy moving exercises can be used as many times as you like. They are especially useful when you feel that your head is getting a bit woolly because they get the energy moving around your eyes and head. They also stimulates a plethora of beneficial acupuncture points. I also suspect that they may encourage hair growth. You can practise these for almost any vision problem and experience positive results.

The above article was excerpted with permission from Leo Angarts book, Read Again Without Glasses”. Leo teaches Throw away your glasses’ workshops all around the world.

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