Clock

What if you can turn back the clock?

In Mind and Movement by niran.jiangLeave a Comment

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Most of us say we have a persistent fear of not having enough time. From morning to dawn, this fear pumps our engine and sends us into autopilot.

 

Tick tock tick

Runs up the hill

Hush rush hush

Dries up your puff

Oh, mortal souls, from dust to dust, we race towards our end.

Time, or more precisely our measurement of time – that eternally ticking clock, shovels us from behind, each and every waking moment. We do what we have to, one day after next…until, we are cast ashore, run out of puff, and wither under the sun like dried prunes…

We go to school, make a living, get married, raise children, and say goodbye to life. We grow up too fast and get old too quickly. Many people around the world, at a fine age as young as 30, feel too old and left behind. In a society of youth glamour, modelled by sports elites and movie stars, the shelf life of prime age continues to shrink, crushing humanity under the cross of ageing.

What gets you going every day? We ask thousands of people this question. The answers are consistently three things: time, fear and target, in this order, all underlined by a persistent fear of not having enough time, of not being worthy enough, and of not achieving enough. From morning to dawn, this fear pumps our engine, sends us into autopilot, and chokes us with a never-ending ‘to do’ list.

If we want to change our reality, how do we shift from a fear paradigm to a trust paradigm? Such a quest is a lifelong journey, which requires us to spend time on not just what we do, but also who we are, in order to live out our thirst for life.

Our story of time may well be a prison cell we have constructed ourselves. I imagine the possibilities of reality otherwise, as if I can ride time.I meditate on my relationship with time, mortality and this world, and my cellular sense of being. I wander in nature and witness the abundant force of time, creating life and beauty.

Yes, becoming a time rider, rather than being a slave of time, that is surely possible. How do I start to breathe differently?

What a world opens up when time becomes my ally. He wipes off my tear and heals my wounds. He teases my impermanence when I dust my house. He carries my tasks to accomplishments. When I am slower, I am faster. When I relax in him, he relaxes in me. Effects come before causes. He gives me an ever-expanding taste of reality. What magical ripples he has in his pond!

What if you can turn back the clock? He urges me on like a good friend. Umm… if time is circular, what would I sense and how would I act? Such questions propel me into new realms of discovery. The family stories, in which I have invested my ego, shatter in time, sending shock waves across psyche with tender aches vibrating in body. I become freer from a linear chain, and occasionally get a glimpse of time travel, when past, present and future queue up as one. What a beautiful moment to savour.

Don’t stop here, he whispers. I follow his footprints – tick tock tick – feeling his graceful tapping in my body. On the tip of his finger, he lifts me up into the eye of his storm. My mind relaxes into stillness, as I watch his powerful swirls sharpening the world all around.

Tick tock tick: life is knocking at the door. In time, harvest forms in your hand.

 

Niran Jiang co-founded the Institute of Human Excellence in Sydney with Sir John Whitmore. She is a strategic advisor, change facilitator and executive coach, with over 20 years of organisational development experience in USA, Europe, Australasia. She is also a seasoned trainer who has taught thousands of coaches and change consultants worldwide. Niran is a native of Inner Mongolia, and currently lives in Sydney, Australia.

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